Greg
Terrine de chevreuil (venison terrine)
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In September 2006, Yvonne bought a surprisingly cheap venison roast in the Central Market, and we had roast it as recommended; that wasn't a complete success. The meat was OK (at $8 a kilogram, obviously not first choice), but the method of preparation wasn't appropriate. Next time we'll try something like a German Wildgulasch. On this occasion, we decided to prepare the last 300 g remaining as a terrine, and that's what I'm describing here. The choice of recipe was complicated by: So: I interpreted the various sources and came up with this:

Ingredients

Quantity      Traditional      Ingredient      Step     
300g venison, pre-cooked 1
60 ml cooking brandy 1
300 g smoked pork fat, in large piece      2
300 g chicken livers 3
500 g pork chops 3
1 g 1 tsp dried oregano 3
1 g 1 tsp dried thyme 3
5 bay leaves 3
6 juniper berries 3
0.1 g 1 clove 3
50 ml cooking brandy 3
10 g 1 clove garlic 3
125 g 2 eggs 4
300 g lard (reduced pork fat) 4
15 g pistachios 4
15 sq cm fresh orange peel 4
8 g salt 4
7 g green pepper 4
250 ml venison gravy, reduced 4
10 bay leaves, for decoration 5

Method

  1. Chop the venison into small stripes and marinate in the brandy.

    Click on the picture to see a medium-size version in the index

    Pre-heat the oven to 150░.

  2. Cut the fat

    Click on the picture to see a medium-size version in the index

    into slices 2mm thick and line the terrine with them:

    Click on the picture to see a medium-size version in the index

    Place in the fridge while performing the remaining work.

  3. Debone the pork chops, remove strings from liver. Mince all finely and leave to stand for at least 2 hours total.
  4. Remove the pith from the orange peel and blanch for about 30 seconds. Chop the garlic and orange peel finely. Chop the pistachios coarsely. Melt the lard until it is barely liquid. In sequence, mix in the ingredients with the minced meat and livers, making sure that each component is well mixed before adding the next. Make sure the lard is last; it will thicken the mixture and make it easier to use.

    Lay a layer of the mixture in the terrine, then add some of the venison.

    Click on the picture to see a medium-size version in the index

    Cover and repeat until finished:

    Click on the picture to see a medium-size version in the index

  5. Place the bay leaves on top of the mixture:

    Click on the picture to see a medium-size version in the index

  6. Cover the terrine with another layer of fat:

    Click on the picture to see a medium-size version in the index

    place in the oven and cook for 75 minutes. I don't (yet) have a temperature that the inside should reach.

  7. The terrine will be spongy. To get the correct texture, it needs to be compressed. Either put a weight on the terrine, or use cable ties, as I have done:


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