Greg
Greg's diary
July 1967
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This page contains a number of German words and phrases. Possibly Google Translate can help, though it's pretty flaky.

In July 1967 I was staying with my friends, the Hallett's Paul Hallett was a school friend who lived on a farm near Brading on the Isle of Wight. I had met his sister Jennifer (with multiple spellings of her name in this text) a year earlier and started a somewhat ambivalent relationship. At the end of the month I left to go to Germany to first learn better German and then to study at the University [of] Hamburg.


Saturday, 1 July 1967 Greenwood → Portsmouth → Greenwood
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... by the police for loitering with intent, nearly clobbered by the owner, until I persuaded him that I was an enthusiast, and then he opened his heart to me, and nearly offered to take us over to Ryde in his fishing boat. Got on the 0100 ferry, and arrived in Fishbourne at 0145, rang Mr. Hallett, who picked us up, and back home, where we eventually arrived at 0245, and pretty quickly hit the sack.

Woke up again at 0810, and, bearing in mind what Jenni had been on Thursday planning to do, up very quickly, and outside, where Mrs. Hallett said that she had been afraid to call me. Eventually got washed, etc, and in to have breakfast, with Jen, and then off down to catch the bus to Ryde—I think it must be later on Saturdays, but anyway, after running lest we were late, we had a 5 minute wait.

Over on the 0930 boat, and arrived in Portsmouth Harbour at about 1000, and decided to walk into town, and up past the Guildhall, and pretty quickly Jenni went into some shops where there were some clothes on sale—well, I had expected her to, and was prepared for her to spend a lot of time—and she certainly took advantage of this preparation.

Eventually decided to do some shopping myself, and looking for a new screw for my 3pod, which has lost one. No luck, but got a screw case retainer for Jenny's Leica, and then, next door, bought an Adler descant recorder for Ann—£ 1-1-8, with mop, which is not at all bad. Off then looking for a cheap loudspeaker, and Jenni was getting a bit fed up with me, which I thought unfair under the circumstances. However, down alone to find a grotty radio components shop, where I picked up a “reconditioned” loudspeaker, 7×4, for 8/6, and a phone plug for 3/-. Then met up with Jenni again, and off to see some more barang, and then, eventually, she bought a skirt, and we went to the Arundel grill near LDB for makan. After that, more looking round, and I finally found a pair of bathing togs which fitted me—the Jantzen ones just are not made for people of my shape.

Jen was still a bit worried about clothes, but managed to get her away, give her an Anadin, and off to a nearby bowling alley, where, after looking around for a while, decided to pay 9/- for a game, and made a pretty average mess of it—though with one ball I got all 10 pins down—spare, as it was the second ball.

After that, back to LDB, where Jen bought some earrings and a pullover, and then, as she was feeling a bit grotty, off to the railway station/harbour in a rather roundabout way, and just missed a boat as a result, and had to wait an hour until the next.

After that, back home and had a bit to eat, after which out into the caravan and tried to get the PCR working, and eventually traced the fault to the ANL, and then spent a bit of time making adjustments, and eventually got it going quite well.

Jennie has been very lovable of late—if she tried, she would have me really crazy about her.


Sunday, 2 July 1967 Greenwood
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Well, I had to sleep in sooner or later, even if it was only until 0845, but at least it makes up for what has been happening to me of late—yesterday Jenni was more exhausted than I was.

In to have breakfast, and to my astonishment Paul was already up—but then, he was only up for about 11 hours yesterday. Jenny was having a bath, which meant that I had to leave my breakfast until she had finished so that I could clean my teeth. Why didn't she just let me in? Oh, Jenni, why are you such a prude?

After breakfast, Paul and I outside, and having a look at the PCR, and had a bit of trouble with the electricity, but eventually got something arranged, and so did a bit of not-very-good alignment, and Paul disappeared into the darkroom to develop a Pan F that he took yesterday. Carried on with the PCR—it is working surprisingly well considering the amount of time it has been on the shelf, and the way it has been treated during that time.

Paul in swearing his head off, having put a rather nice kink in his Pan F [trying to load it into a spiral], and trying to find a Nikkon [sic] spiral. Then off again, and I in to find Jenni making a blouse, and thus untouchable—I wish she were not always making clothes. Decided that I smelt, and so had a bath, which did not please various people who complained about lack of water, notably Paul, who rang up the water board about the fact, and then gave up. Had lunch then in the kitchen, and there Paul and Jen had quite a nice row with each other about nothing in particular, unless it is Paul's capacity for loganberries.

In the afternoon, dragged Jennie out into the caravan somehow, and Paul was there too (unfortunately!). Mrs. Hallett cam in at one point (quick removal of hands from strategic positions, which she apparently noticed). Apologised for disturbing us, until I pointed out that Paul was there as well. However, a little later she persuaded Jenni to leave the caravan to lay the tea, and so Jenni out and locked herself in the lounge with the paper and left me to lay the tea—I did not like that at all, and was very annoyed for a while. But how can I stay angry with Jen? I only wish I could—but it is impossible. Oh, what is going to happen to my love life in this second half of 1967? I only wish I knew.

Out again, and more alignment, and also got the ANL and tone control working again, and Jennie out calling Paul a murderer for killing the guinea pig, and stayed out for a while, before getting back to her blouse. After a while, trying to help with chemistry, and then out to get a bit of shut eye. In to find Jen finishing her blouse, washed her hair, sat on my knee for about 2 minutes and went to bed. SWL in the evening—2 Indian stations, and possibly Radio Australia as well.


Monday, 3 July 1967 Greenwood → Bembridge → Greenwood
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Difficulty again getting up early this morning, and only just about managed it, and in to find Jenni and Paul—Paul was still in bed, presumably assuming that as he was on holiday, there was not much point in his getting up early. In any case, Jenni and I had breakfast, and left for school, and he was still not about, so off with Jen—I wish she would kiss me goodbye of a morning, though I can see her point about not doing so. After leaving her, which is always a rather unpleasant activity, down into Sandown, and into a chemists, whose name I should know, and bought a packet of Beecham's powders for Jenni, who has a cold, and also 7 600cc bottles for the Ektachrome, which was immenent[sic]—in fact, we had intended to do same today, but by this time we had given it up as a bad job. Also posted a letter for Jenni to this bird in France with whom she is going to say at the end of this month.

Back again, and before I le much further time pass (except for the purposes of reading the paper and making some coffee) rang up International World travel Ltd. in Ryde, who were apparently very well acquainted with Jenni's travel arrangements—too well, I thought, for an agency with a lot of work on. Booked myself a passage with her as far as Paris Austerlitz.

Then Paul and I wondering what to do, and came to the conclusion that it would be fun to go sailing or something, and so off by foot to Bembridge, trying in vain to thumb a lift, and then across the fields, which proved quite a photogenic journey, and took quite a few photos—I have started on a roll of Ektachrome which I am rating at 250ASA, which I hope will be successful.

Arrived in Bembridge, and saw little. Eventually, going across the harbour in the ferry, asked the ferry bloke about it, and he reckoned that the had the own which they would be prepared to let for 15/- for the first hour, and 10/- for every successive hour, which Paul thought reasonable—OK, say I, let him pay. However, it was low water then, and Bembridge harbour (in fact, it is Brading harbour) is pretty tricky, so off for some food at a couple of nearby pubs, while Paul told me he was thinking of going abroad on his bike in September.

Back the way we came (or as close to it as we could remember) and arrived at the house, well nigh exhausted, at something like 1555, and back down the lane with Mrs. Hallett very little later in order to meet Jennie at the bus stop, and so fast did I leave that I still had my 400mm lens round my neck.

Then off, up again when Jen finally arrived, 2 buses later than usual—she has bought herself a pattern, and as soon as she got back started making a dress with it, which activity more or less absorbed her for the whole evening, rather to my disgust—especially since it is for a school dance on Friday, which I cannot attend—the though of that makes me feel absolutely désolé.

Little in the evening—ended up asleep on the couch with Jen, and later doing some SWL'ing.


Tuesday, 4 July 1967 Greenwood
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Feeling exceptionally tired today, and despite all good intentions, felt entirely unable to get up in time for breakfast with Jenni and was first woken up by her to tell me what the time was, and later to kiss me goodbye—oh Jen, how I love you for the little things you do, the things that show you really care!

Woke up again, quite a bit later, and inside to find that Paul, who had only just got up, had eaten the breakfast which Mrs. Hallett had made for me some hours before, and so I had to make do with some cornflakes. Then arose the usual problem—what to do? I suggested Ektachrome, and so inside to the darkroom and proceeded to make the chemicals up, while Paul buzzed around, saying that he felt like a good cigar to improve his appetite for lunch, and so I suggest he went and whipped a few from his father, and while he was off appeared this rather odd Cambridge scholar bloke, who asked me the time. I think he is a queer, which I suppose is a pretty fair accusation for any bloke from Cambridge. Paul then back with some big Habana cigars, of which he decanted 3 into a paper box, and with my aid, smuggled the rest back. By this time it was getting on for lunch, and so we decided that the cigars would just have to improve our digestion, and ended up in the caravan listening to the radio until lunch came up, and then in for that—even with Paul about, there is not much improvement in the atmosphere, and it occurs to me that it is Jenni's presence that I need.

Off pretty soon after lunch, and up onto the down, with Prince, and did our best to get through Paul's dry, grotty sticks of dynamite, making the usual plans for the future, which, I expect, will never come to anything. Still, I should like Jenni to come over and stay with me some time—even if it is only by herself (or preferably!). But sometime I must get alone with Jen for some protracted time—who knows—I could end up marrying her. Certainly to my love-smitten mind the idea seems very sound indeed. Oh, Jen...

Back down to the house, and decided to go “down Sandown” and buy some more cigars, or take some photos of the human rubbish on the beach, or something, but ended up picking up Ann, buying some food, windowshopping at Holiday Snaps, and picking up Jen, who had some shopping of her own to do, and then home for tea, after which Jennie had some more work to do on her dress, and so Paul and I out to develop Ektachrome, and set off at it very quickly, and it occurred to me that with very few aids I could process Ektachrome by myself. Certainly Paul did not do much himself this time, and I was doing 2—though had some fun when I forgot the clearer.

This was on some of the slides of the Asia trip, which show a pink cast as a result.

Jen is a bit off lately. Wonder if it is her period. Had an argument with her, hit her, and hurt her—very sorry later.

Picked up Radio Peking—or rather, Radio Red Guards.


Wednesday, 5 July 1967 Greenwood
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Same this morning as yesterday—except that I might have got up earlier had I not looked forward to Jenni coming and kissing me goodbye. As it was, I got up as soon as she had gone, and inside to wake Paul up, and then out and did a bit of cutting up film, and back in to have some breakfast—it really annoys me the way Paul treats the rest of his family, and the docile way that all except Jenni, and occasionally Mr. Hallett take it.

Outside again later, and the usual problems: what to do? Decided to take some photos, which was not a bad idea for a couple of photographers, and so got down to it, and took quite a few close ups round the flower bed outside, and after a while ended up so paralysed that I just lay there doing nothing and contemplating life. Later into the caravan and contemplated connecting up my PCR as an audio amplifier as well as a radio, and did all this on the big 125W soldering iron of Mr Hallett's. Paul was with me while I was doing this, and along came Peggy with Helen [her baby daughter]—whom I have never really looked at before. Paul hid himself, so as not to inhibit Peggy, and she decided to have her usual conversation, while I did my best to fix up the volume control pot, and see what was wrong with it—a tag came off. Eventually she left, and Paul was in stitches.

Later in for lunch, which was early, and fairly quick in view of all the activities that were going on, and after that, ended up helping Mrs. Hallett with the washing up, as Paul was showing little inclination to do so, and then prepared to go and see Jenni's school sports (God knows exactly why, except that I had told her I would go), and got hold of Paul's bike—he was out taking Prince for a walk—and then went the back way, via Fairway road, to the school, and the actual affair was on the Fairway fields, and quite a poorly attended show it happened to be, too—many more girls than boys, as well—or maybe it is something to do with turnout. Met several more of Jennie's friends—including Sally, who seems a little more mild in her appearance. One of them, who is called Ros, looks very much like Gillian de [sic] Souza. Jen tells me that she was very keen to meet me until she discovered I was not Malaysian. Jen was wearing some very tight shorts—wow: I have never seen anything as nice as that in tight shorts before.

Eventually got some shots of Jen running, and then off to see the (rather feeble) exhibition, and back after that, as I could not be bothered waiting for 2 hours. Paul furious because he had apparently forgotten I had asked him for the loan of his bike this morning. Made peace with him fairly quickly, and then set to developing Ektachrome, even more on my own than yesterday. Very good results too.

Jenni back very late, and I was rather worried about her. Came into the caravan after tea, and stayed there with me about an hour or so. I love Jen—how many times have I said that?


Thursday, 6 July 1967 Greenwood
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Managed again to get up early enough this morning to have breakfast with Jenni—I think, on the whole, it is more fun when she comes in and wakes me up, but getting up then also makes one feel that the day is half wasted by the time one gets up, and so I decided I would have to forgo [sic] the joy of being woken up by a kiss from Jenni, and got up before her and in to await breakfast, and discovered that Mrs. Hallett had a headache—not that this counts for much in this family.

Jenni was pretty busy with the dress she was making this morning, and I hardly had a chance to get a word in edgeways—and to make matters worse, they were late, so she had time to kiss me goodbye, and so I decided to yet again go with her to school.

Decided, this time, to go straight back from school rather than to mess around in Sandown, and when I got back, Paul was up, and raring to go. I wanted to do something about my enlarger, and so in to have a look at it, without much success—finally traced the cause of the lack of voltage, but as we had no solder, could not fix the thing up. Eventually Paul, who was a little fed up in any case, decided to go down town, and left me to tidy up the caravan, which was badly in need thereof, and came back a little later with some Savbit and an Exchange and Mart, and proceed to look for any used Citroëns—the cheapest this week is an immaculate 1961 DS19 for only £75—why? Peggy along as I tried in vain to fix up the radio—all rather distressing. Listening to some false prophet trying to persuade us a) he was genuine b) the world is coming to an end. Then a bit of real live music, after which lunch, and did little after that—back to the caravan, where I was still tidying up a bit, and then along came Peggy again, and said something to us, but, unfortunately, Paul rather spoilt the atmosphere by being just plain bluntly rude to her.

After a while, Peggy went away, and I carried on trying to puzzle out the problem of the power supply, and eventually Paul managed to persuade me to do something about the microphone, and connected a couple of leads to the thing, and got a rather feeble signal on the scope before I judged it time to go and meet Jenni at the bus stop. What I had forgotten was the she had intended to buy a pair of tights after school for this bloody dance thing tomorrow night—how the hell can I bear to let her go?

Eventually, at 1700 hrs, she arrived, and back up together, and said something about having plenty of work to do, and so I left her and got a water bath set up for E2 processing, and then had tea, after which got Paul to come along and help with the E2, although I am getting more self sufficient, and I hardly saw Paul at all. Taj Mahal came out beautifully.

In the evening, helping Jen with her chemistry, and then had supper—Ann was unwell. Paul about, irritating Jenni, and eventually got a very late night—Jen will be bouncing with life tomorrow.


Friday, 7 July 1967 Greenwood
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Overslept again this morning, and I think I might, finally, have worked out why. I was in the middle of a rather pleasant dream (probably about Jenni), when I should have woken up, and this prevented me from waking up, and I finally woke up at 0840, by which time I judged it rather late to get up for breakfast, and so waited until my beloved came and kissed me goodbye, and after that, it occurred to me that there was really little further reason for an immediate get up, and so decided to catch up on my sleep, and eventually woke up at about 1050 or 1100, when Paul came in, just after I had woken. Accordingly in, to where, as of old, Mrs. Hallett wished me a good evening, and, rather to Paul's annoyance, I took the only cooked breakfast, and ate it. Then hung around, reading the paper, and did very little—decided to find about trains from Paris to Hamburg, and wrote about half a letter to Mum and Dad, and then got bogged down because there was nothing further that I could write until I could find out about details of the journey, etc.

After that, lunch, and Mrs. Hallett, who had been having a bit of trouble with a rather sick Ann (whom I had given an Entero vioform to clean out her guts), suggested that Paul and I went for a swim, and I also had the problem of money, so we decided to go down town, and tried to get the car, but Mr. Hallett needed the car, so took us down about half an hour later, and first off to the National & Provincial bank, who could not cash my cheque, as it had to be paid into an account, and so off to Lloyds, found (by telephone) that I was still on their lists, and so paid in my cheque and drew out £2, and transferred my account to Sandown, and then off down to buy some new Ektachrome chemicals, and then (supposedly) for a swim, but did not like the look of the water much, and so gave it up as a bad job, and just wandered about taking photos. Then tried to get Jen's bus back to the house, but she was not on it, and so off on the next one, and was waiting for her at that end when Paul came down and picked me up, saying Jen was already at home, and so up, where I saw a little of her between getting ready for this dance, and took a couple of photos. Then took her down to the school, to let her go, and back, and had just got the prewet bath into the Ektachrome, when we ran out of water, and after letting the Salters know, Graham offered me the contents of their (cold) hot water tank. Ektachrome came out OK, apart from a bit of temperature trouble. Down after that to the pub—publican recognised me as “Digger”.

Picked Jenni up, but all she did was complain about the fact that I had thongs on, and so very depressed back at home, and almost cried myself to sleep.


Saturday, 8 July 1967 Greenwood → Bembridge → Greenwood
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Woke up at about 0900 this morning, with rather irritated me, as we had intended to go to Bembridge (or Brading harbour) to go sailing this morning, and an early start would have helped. Still, up as quickly as possible, and in to wake up Jenni, and she was still tired from last night, and so I ended up making some tea for everybody, and took a cup up to Jenni, and then eventually she got up. Not so much luck with Paul, however, and Mrs. Hallett had made us breakfast before he stirred. Eventually had breakfast, and off getting barang ready—Jenni had been worried earlier that the weather would not be too hot, but it began to prove her wrong and so off down across the fields, and started thumbing on the road to Bembridge, risking our luck on the basis that “All the world loves a lover”, and perhaps it was so for, though we were not too lucky, it seemed that we were luckier than usual. Certainly luckier than Paul had allowed for, because by the time he had arrived, we had already ascertained that the sea was too rough for them to let us take a boat out, and we would have to put up with messing around in Brading harbour, and we decided that it was not worth it just for that, and so decided to move down to the Forelands and sunbathe and swim, and just then Paul rolled up, and the 3 us down the substitute for a beach.

Eventually Jenni got a bit tired of walking, and so stopped at a place a little better than the average, and so stripped down to our bathing togs, and lay down to sunbathe for a while. Jen looks very well in her bikini—though possibly would be better as a monokini. She is just a little wide under the bottom—slight, but pleasant exposure. Went in for a swim after all—very cold, but Jen enjoyed it. Then back home, continuing along the beach, which Paul went back. Jen forgot to bring a bra to change into it—but she doesn't need one, she is so well formed. Got a lift back from the Whitecliff bay caravan camp to Brading, and after lunch Jen caught up on her sleep, and I had a bath, and moped around for a while.

After a while sitting and, despite Ann, reading the paper, I gave up and went and woke up a not very happy Jennie, and shortly later had tea. After tea, sitting watching TV, and Jenni really hurt me by refusing to hold my hand. I nearly cried, and Jen, seeing the tears in my eyes, realised that she had hurt me—suddenly very affectionate, and I know she feels badly about it, but is it really in her power to love me? I doubt it. Ah, 'tis one of the tragedies of life that I should fall so much in love with a girl who doesn't really love me. Off for a walk later, while she told me it was all her fault for not loving somebody as wonderful as I [sic]—ah, what the hell? It's not really like that. At any rate she has gone off her dream boy. Did little after we got back—if only Jenni could love me the way I love her.


Sunday, 9 July 1967 Greenwood
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Still feeling unhappy about Jenni not really loving me this morning, and did not feel like getting up, and lay in bed until Paul (why could it not have been Jenni?) came in at about 1000 hrs and said something to the effect that I had better get up and get rid of my breakfast for his mother's sake, though when I got inside (and discovered that Jen had already done the honours), Mrs. Hallett and Ann were also starting breakfast, so I was not really late.

Saw Jenni sunbathing outside about half way through, and so off to join here, and hung about for a while taking photos, or at least thinking about it, and looking at her beautiful shape as only slightly concealed by her bikini—I want her more than ever now, even if I know that she doesn't really love me—I can still teach her, can't I? Ann came along fairly soon, though, and soon we were all shelling broad beans, which is a pleasant occupation for lovers. Then had a discussion with Paul about money, and persuaded him that I did not, in fact, owe him any money from last January, and so all was more or less happy—though when I came out, to tell Jennie that I had first made mention of her in this diary on 18 January 1966, she was not there, and took the Dog for a walk with Paul, looking for Jen—but no luck for a while.

Then found her, and shortly later lunch, and thereafter outside again into the glorious sun, and before at all long enough, Jen decided that it was too cold (well, I suppose it was a little cool, but it was not that bad), and in to the living room, and there Jen lay down with her knees on my lap, and got my hands moving—is it a result of what happened yesterday, or is she getting more amorous with me?—and she did not seem to object—indeed, she seemed to enjoy it quite a bit.

Out to help with the drying up, back—she was a little less coöperative—oh, I hate this guilt complex on her part. Then she said something about having some work to do, and so I went into the caravan to to read my old diary and be unhappy—back to my old depressed days at the beginning of last February—and in came Paul and Jeni a little later, and sat down on my knee and started reading even further back, and then a little later, of when we first met—oh Jeni, you should but sleep with me! How I desire and love you!

Then off to Whitecliff bay—why, I don't know, and I wouldn't have gone had Jeni not wanted me to, and as it was we did not swim, but just walked up to the edge of Culver cliff, took copious photos (yes, even Jeni!), and back again, and back home again, and then had tea.

After tea, Paul and I decided to do some Ektachrome, and I discovered had rewound a 48 after only 35, which annoyed me—why did that have to happen?

Everybody to bed after that—Jeni and I up the latest. She not very happy. Rondo from Clt. concerto in A (Mozart) on the radio!


Monday, 10 July 1967 Greenwood → Ventnor → St. Catherine's → Greenwood
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Up early enough this morning as a result of the impending walk which Jen has got me to join in on, and found her just about up, sewing some bra tabs onto her blouse, and soon she was up, and down to do something about packing, and then had breakfast, while Jenni got into a hell of a flap because it was so obvious that we would not be able to leave for Sandown in time for Ann, and, true enough, we got left behind when Mr. Hallett went in. OK, but why does Jen have to kick up such a hell of a fuss about it? Eventually got our makan washed out, anyway, and set off by foot to Sandown, where Jenni wanted to get some shoes. Persuaded her that she didn't need anyway [sic], and, as we had so much time at our disposal, we might as well thumb to Ventnor. I ought to take Jenni as a lucky charm wherever I go, but.... We had just got to the beginning of Braodway when we stopped a bleached bond in a station wagon, going to Ventnor town hall as fast as it would take her, and we even managed to pick up Sally on the way. Arrived in Ventnor with an hour to spare, and spent it walking around. Eventually back at the Town Hall, people began to trickle in, and, after buying such essentials as wine and yoghourt, we set off, led by a bloke called Jamie, and off in the direction of St. Catherines, and as the weather was so beautiful, ended up with our shoes off, and later, all the boys with their shirts off.

Eventually arrived in a little bay just round the corner from St. Catherines' light house, and everybody changed for a swim, though, as it always is in this country, the water was icy. Nasty rocks all over the place, too, which rather worried me, and soon all of us out in any case—Jen seemed very far away, for some reason.

Had lunch—food looked pretty grotty, after the long walk, and reminded me strongly of the seaweed in which we had just been swimming, but we nevertheless ate it. Jen also rather liked the wine, even if it was a grotty sauterne [sic]. I wonder how she would like decent wine... at least she is not childish in her taste, like some people I know.

Spent the afternoon lazing around, burning, playing cards row [?], etc, and all would have been more fun had Jenni not been so cold. The surprising thing is that none of the others even so much as held hands with each other—why, I don't know. Out for another swim, in which several people scratched themselves on rocks—even Jeni did not do herself much good. Then changed, and off to hit the main road, and thence thumbed to Ventnor in an old bomb, and had a bit of difficulty then, walking nearly to Shanklin, where we got a lift to Lake, and walked back home.

Jen was in pain this evening, despite the suntan lotion I put on her back, and was in fact rather miserable, especially when she could not get any water for her bath. Did not kiss me goodnight—I terribly unhappy, and went and cried myself to sleep, forgetting even to undress until about 0300 hrs.


Tuesday, 11 July 1967 Greenwood
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Woke up several times in the night (after I had finally, at about 0300, gone properly to bed), feeling miserable, and leaving Jeni to go to school without a chance to say goodbye to me—I was feeling thoroughly disgusted with her for a change, and so off to sleep again after she had gone—I suppose it was not her fault that she is feeling grotty, what with the sunburn, but she has been hurting me a lot with her behaviour of late. Slept on and off for some time, more because of my depression than because I was tired. Oh, why does Jenni have to do this to me?

Eventually, as it was so warm, I could sleep no more, depression or no depression, and so got up, made my bed, and went in to the comment “I thought you never got tired”, etc, but strangely enough, not “Good afternoon”. In any case, there was a letter awaiting me from Mum, and included my Goethe-Institut card, which I apparently need to get into the place in Garlopstraße 2, 314 Lüneburg. Decided, after having something in the nature of a bite to eat, to ring up the travel agents, and found out that it only cost £7··12··6 from Paris to Hamburg, which seems pretty good. As a result, then into the caravan to finish my letter to Mum and Dad, and then decided to go down town and see what gave with my bank account. Considering I only went to see about it on Friday, I ought to have realised from my knowledge of the postal services between here and Taunton that it could not possibly have been in order—nor was it. Back home again, after buying another Unit 2 for the E2, and then had lunch, toward the end of which, as we were discussing money for Jenni, enter (or rather, appear) Peggy at the window, holding something behind her back, and asks me to check in my dictionary what the German for measles was, and eventually produced this book, „Die Frau als Hausärtztin“ from behind her back, including some some horrible photos of a bloke with monoclinic crystals growing out of his knuckle—nearly made me sick. And she was back a little later with some photos of her wedding and childhood—not very nice. After that arrived the blokes from the water board, who had a look at the pipes, found that downstairs there was 18 ft of head of water in the tap, and they suggested that we could only hope for a new main from the road, and that we would have to keep on the Water Board to get it.

Deliberately didn't go and get Jeni, and played musical instruments until teatime, to Jen's visible irritation, and then in for tea, after which out again to be joined by Jeni, who said little, and left at the slightest provocation. What is wrong between us? I wish we could be happy together, but something seems to be going wrong. Still, she was more or less OK this evening, if still untouchable because of her sunburn. Ah, Jeni, why am I compelled to love you?


Wednesday, 12 July 1967 Greenwood
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Up this morning pretty early, in order to prove to everybody that I could, in fact, get up early, and overdid it—neither Paul nor Jeni were up, and so had a bit of a wait on. Paul off very late, in fact, and then Jeni rather behind time, and I decided to say goodbye to her here, which brought the added advantage that I could kiss her goodbye.

After that, not much to do for a while. The weather here has been glorious of late, and I would probably prefer this to the weather as it usually is in Malaysia. Did a bit of piano playing, as I have found a book of easy Christmas carols, which are easy enough to be encouraging, and I might, with a bit of practice, even manage to get them right by Christmas.

After a while, decided that I might as well get down to town and see what had happened to my bank account, especially in view of the fact that today is a half day, and so wrote a letter to Marston and Heard ordering 700 slide mounts—wherever am I gout to put all the slides—and off down town to find that the red tape had still not been untied. Bought an AP, and left it at that, espeicially in view of the fact that financial resources were not too good.

Back to the house, let my toe heal up (I stubbed it on a stone in the lane), and read the AP until lunch time.

After lunch, at which Ann was present—for some reason (something to do with the school sports?) she had the afternoon off—back int the caravan, and working out how many people I have mentioned in this diary. Looks as if it could run into 4 figures.

After that it [sic], Mr. & Mrs. Hallett & Ann decided to go down for a swim, and I was not invited, apparently because Ann had said that I didn't want to go. Never mind—I didn't particularly. Hung about reading for a while, then took Prince for a walk, and back up again. Down to meet Jeni at the bus stop, and waited over an hour before I got suspicious that she might have come directly home, and not bothered to come down and tell me, so up, found her absent, and back down again—she finally arrived at 1815, 2 hours late, and nearly walked away from the bus stop without me. Up with her, had makan, and then she suggested that we went down for a swim, so took her up on that (eventually) after all sorts of elaborate preparations, but did not stay in long, especially as my toe was flapping in the water, and I could not swim as a result. Back home—Jen was very nasty to me, and then came in belligerently (for a while—she nearly cried later on) saying she did not know what to make of her life, and I made several suggestions, and offered to get hold of Ricky Cookson and see if he could help.

Ricky was a friend from school. I have no idea why he should have been able to help.

Later on, she was in one of her penitent moods, sorry for having hurt me—what difference does it make?


Thursday, 13 July 1967 Greenwood
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Up again early and in for breakfast with Jeni, and she is still in agony about her sunburn, and as a result was not very friendly—not that she ever is in the morning. In any case, kissed her goodbye, and then change my mind, and decided to go into town and get some stuff—Paul and Jenni had been arguing a lot about L plates and so on, and I had promised Jeni that I would buy her at least one. Other things also remained to be done, and so in with Mr. Hallett (and thus Jeni as far as Ann's school), and then looking for an enlarging bulb for Paul's enlarger, and all I could find was a 150 W job at Pollard and Ramage, which I eventually bought. Then floated around, doing little, until 1000hrs, when I went to the bank, and, thank God, my account has been transferred, so sent off a cheque to M&H, and walked back home, via Sandown Garage, to get the L plates—they have a grey Citroën DS21 Pallas there. Very nice.

After getting home, got down to printing some passport photos of Jeni, and then had a bit of fun because Paul's paper is as good as useless, and I ended up having to use some of my Bromesko, which did not do badly.

Then, while the things were drying, rang up Ricky Cookson, who was rather surprised to hear from me, and was rather dubious about whether Seravac would be of much use to Jen, and suggested that we tried elsewhere. Still would be pleased to be of any help. Started a letter to him before lunch came up.

Serverac was a South African company, and Ricky was from South Africa, so maybe his father was a big boss there.

Back out in the caravan after lunch, and was soon joined by Peggy and Helen, who was apparently chewing something black of indeterminate origin, which did not seem to worry Peggy. I am getting a bit fed up with her—she is prying into my private life a bit, too, and I ended up telling her that Eileen [our cook in Kuala Lumpur] was my mother (this after she saw a photo of Eileen), and she believed it, rather to my amusement, and then, finally, away, apologising that she could not stay any longer. At least she was pleased by my photos—but they are of course in a different world from her own. After that, put some shoes on, gathered up Jeni's birth certificate and the passport photos, which by this time were dry, and walked into town and had quite a long wait for Jeni, and then we set off for the Labour Exchange, and got a Visitor's passport application form, and halfway through, discovered that she needed written consent from her father, and so set off back home after buying her mother a birthday card, and then up to the house, had makan, and almost immediately Jen disappeared, and emerged a little later ready to go to some meeting at school, and I into the darkroom to develop a couple of Ektachromes, including (finally) the shots of Khajuraho. Jen back late, convinced (thanks be to God) to go to University. That is one problem more or less done, anyway.


Friday, 14 July 1967 Greenwood
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Oh, life even here is getting boring after nearly a month, especially as Jen is not about. One of these days I am going to have to find a girl (not necessarily Jen—she is getting a bit objectionable of late) with whom I can spend more time. But I wonder—would I ever get on with any bird as well as I would with Jeni? After all, they say that lovers quarrel (if that is proportional, we must be really in love!).

Up a little later than usual, with Mr. Hallett complaining about the mess in the darkroom, and he lost his temper with me when I started my breakfast first—would not let me continue. Ah well—I am obviously being treated like one of the family (in fact, not quite, but one could hardly expect it yet).

Off to school with Jen—she did not really want me to come in thongs, but I persuaded her that it was important for the success of our relationship.

Back after that, not for any particular reason, apart from the fact that Mrs. Hallett wanted my washing, and I had not had any done for about a week.

In the morning, did very little: considered whether I would be able to get a Visitor's passport, and came to the conclusion that I probably would, though I was, in fact, excluded.

I think this meant that I was wondering if I, as an Australian citizen, could get a passport for myself, even though I wasn't eligible. I suspect that answer would be “no”, but in the UK identification is so sloppy that it would not be impossible. Years later I was on the electoral rolls in Devon

Then lunch, after which Mrs. Hallett was in a hurry about something, and so helped her wash up, and then back into the caravan and started reading Paul's book about 2 strokes, and finally understand how the things work, though I doubt it can be very efficient. No wonder Hondas have so much better performance.

After a while, just sitting round doing nothing in particular, and gradually got more and more tired, and eventually off to sleep for a while, and woke up at about 1530, and gradually at that. Then down town, after putting some shoes on, and waited for Jen at the Post office, but she didn't turn up, and, after checking with the house, home, and followed about 10 minutes later by Jenni, who dashed in, shouting “Greggie” apologetically, put her arms round me and stayed there until reminded of her mother's presence. Latter apparently little pleased by this.

After that, had makan, and then Jen decided that she would have to finish her Ektachrome, and so helped her—she used a 135mm Super Takumar for the last 3 exposures, and I hope for her sake that they come out well.

After that, Jen writing for University prospectuses, and I cleaning out some of my photographic stuff, including pentaprism, which is easily accessible and interesting. After that, another family row, and Jen very unhappy and fatalistic, and eventually went off to bed—what a waste of time.


Saturday, 15 July 1967 Greenwood
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Jen had said something last night to the effect that she would be sleeping in this morning, as she was tired, and so I was surprised to hear her complaining voice at about 0810, alternating with her mother's somewhat quieter one. After ascertaining that it was, in fact, her, went in the house (after dressing), and discovered that she had returned to the bog, and so hung around—why is everybody here so edgy of late? I suspect Jenni is having her period at the moment, but surely her mother is past all that? Otherwise the coincidence would explain it all. Eventually had a breakfast of cereals, and then Jen said something about going down to get some foreign currency (French), and a passport, and then hanging around a long while for Mr. Hallett to prepare to go down town, and after considerably messing around, off down town, decided not to go to the bank today, and off to the Labour Exchange, which we found closed, and so off to the Post office to buy some stamps, after which off to see a bloke raving on about commercial radio, Radio London in particular, and heard a lot of bullshit from him. Then wandered along the front, and after going through an amusement arcade, off, bought some E2 chemicals, and then home, and got Jenni's opinion on split image/microprism rangefinders, and she is definitely sold on the latter—not that I blame her, but it means that if she wants a Praktika [sic; should be Praktica] it will have to be a current model—either a Nova or much less likely a Mat—but how much would a second hand Praktika Nova with Tessar cost?

After that, messing around, playing three nasty Christmas carols, reading the paper, etc, and so to lunch, after which we had intended to go into Ryde, especially in view of some interesting stuff advertised in the paper, but Mr. Hallett had different ideas, and wanted first to clean out the car, which certainly took no short time. Jen drying her hair, after which we hung about in the lounge room more or less on ace [sic; ?], and then all sorts of odd preparations went on, while Paul and I took the easy way out and went off to sleep, and so stayed a while, woke up a little, and found Mr. Hallett in his best suit—that fellow is, at times, rather odd. Jenni kicking up a fuss about not having any L plates on the car, and so took the law into her own hands. Eventually got to Ryde, and off to buy Mrs. Hallett a projector, and got, as Paul had originally recommended, and Aldis SN12. Then off looking for other things, and bought quite a bit of stuff before going off, via some market garden, back home, and had tea.

After that, loading still more EX, including Jen's, which had been chewed up a bit by a Leica, and had a hell of a job getting it in. Developed them—Jen's did not come out at all badly—and then in and mounted some slides, and then projected them—all the usual fuss setting up the projectors, but I must admit that this QI lighting is excellent.


Sunday, 16 July 1967 Greenwood
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Mrs. Hallett's birthday

Up at about 0900 this morning, following a visit by Ann suggesting that I get up, and then staggered half asleep into the kitchen, where it occurred to me, after a couple of seconds, that Mr. Hallett looked a little odd, and a second or two later it occurred to me that it was somebody else—Uncle George, in fact, whom I saw last, if my memory serves me, a year ago today (yes, checked and confirmed), and he recognised me despite the beard—in fact, I found out later that he had just been looking at a recent slide of me, and so it was not really surprising. Didn't leave me any money this time, though I noticed he left Jenni 9d, and presumably the same for Ann as well. He was an early bird, anyway—off before breakfast, at about 0910. I wonder if I will be here and see them, this time next year. Ah, what does this year hold in store?

After that, Jenni helping with the washing up, after which she decided to mount her slides, and so offered a bit of help—not that she needed much of it: she is more proficient at all this than is Paul, although she finds cutting the film a little fiddly—and so it is. Looking through literature on the Practika (or is it Praktika? I expect so.) Loos as if we will have to get Jen a new Nova with Tessar—£ 50 over here, hope it won't cost more than £25 over there. [Germany] Could be a lot less.

Then had our own private showing of Jenni's slides, after which we were visited by the Jehovah's witnesses people, whom we has saw (or I last saw—Paul has seen a lot of them) on the 30/X/1966, and the bloke started off with “Where were we last time we met—oh yes, the interpretation of the teachings of the bible”, and on thus, although one bloke left halfway, until lunch time, and in fact heard a bit of their philosophy. Interesting, though I find it difficult to agree with a few things. Then lunch—excellent meal, though I think there are better ways of roasting pork than en masse.

After this lunch, was roped in by Jeni, who was herself under compulsion, to help wash/dry up, and then looking at some more slides, and on thus until Aunties Vi and Biddy arrived, after which we had quickly to grab our barang, and head down to the beach for a swim. Very warm water and cold wind, which caused a fog coming in from the sea—most odd. Back home, had a shower, and then out for tea—today is a real reunion day. I have met 4 people I have not seen for some time—am getting to know quite a few people on the Island.

No idea who the fourth was.

After tea, got round to setting up a slide show, and then out to hear a rather grotty music recital by Lesley and Ann, and then showed hundreds of slides, going on for hours—Jen got quite bored half way through, and walked out, and we ended up showing to Vi and Bid, and got through all except a couple of my slides. Vi and Bid off after that, and tidied up—Jen a little more amorous tonight—photos of my other girls got her jealous, I think.


Monday, 17 July 1967 Greenwood
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Something this morning made me feel like staying in bed—in all probability the fact that this morning I did not get to bed until 0130 hrs—or rather, not to sleep until then. In any case, the thought of Jeni out there was not even enough to coerce me to get up, and so waited until she came in and complained about the loss of her prefect badge, and then kissed me goodbye—I get the feeling, tough, that she no longer cares for me the way she once did. I think that the end may well be near, especially as in the next months I am likely to meet quite a few birds.

After she left, went back to sleep, which was not initially very difficult, and eventually got up at 1045—I really should get up earlier, as this must be very inconvenient to Mrs. Hallett. After getting up, in, to where Mrs. Hallett was doing the washing, and had breakfast, made some coffee, and brought her in my washing stuff, and then set up the card table in the next room (the lounge), and started mounting slides, as my slide mounts have finally come, and then on until lunchtime with such activities—mounted 6 films in the 1½ hours to lunch, and in that time also managed to inscribe cross references on the mounts.

After lunch, straight back to the remaining 9 films, and before too long entered Peggy, obviously disappointed that she had not seen the slide show yesterday, and wanted to know what I was doing, and stayed there talking quite a bit, wanting to know what Kodak did wrong that they should send her back 36 mounted transparencies, 33 of which were black. Comment to Helen made me laugh uncontrollably: “Come on darling—Nana is asleep in bed... the lazy old pig”. It would really make a good ciné film, life across the road. I wonder how we could do it.

On, ever on, with the slides, and got 12 of them mounted before it occurred to me that I had better go and meet Jen so that she could get her passport, and then off, after putting an old CE back into my camera, and spent a while waiting there [sic] for her, and actually recognised her as she came into sight.

Off down to the Labour Exchange, and had an argument about cheques on the way, and then off to the Jehovah's witnesses place in the Avenue road, with Jenni complaining about the fact that she would have to wait—this after having led me all round town while she window-shopped—very nice of her. After getting the stuff, she said something to the effect that she did not want to be seen with me carrying copies of “Awake”, and so, furious, I strode off, and determined to break off the whole affair, and home, and started mounting slides again, openly ignoring Jen, to her evident discomfort, and then took Prince for a walk, after finishing mounting the slides—which she offered to help me with—and then back again, and set up the projector. Jeni very amorous, to make up for it all, and hopped onto my knee, and I could not resist her charms. A couple of boring moments for Paul at the end of the magazines. She took the photos of Khajuraho better than I expected—possibly because she was feeling a little uncertain of keeping me—and by no means without cause. Mentioning Régine Ruiz did not help her.


Tuesday, 18 July 1967 Greenwood
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Up at about 0815 this morning with the noise of Paul starting his bike, and in to have breakfast with Jen, at which nothing eventful happened, and then Jen off without giving me more of a peck in way of goodbye—I fear it is all off with her, no matter what she may do. The real trouble is that I am too weak to resist her, and I will just have to avoid her. Oh, why do I have always to pick the grotty ones? I hope I have more success in the next few months, anyway. I wonder what sort of impression I will make on the German girls—I might not do at all badly. I wonder also what social life at Lüneburg will be like, since this will have much more bearing on my immediate future.

After Jeni went off, outside—lousy weather, and a day which brought back nostalgic memories—the kind that one would not necessarily want to forget, but rather to be able to remember in more detail. I feel like a bit of mushy nostalgia, anyway—let me blow, burn, push or sowas. Took Prince for a walk round the area, further than normal, after which read the paper, avoiding Peggy in the process, and then looking through my old letters from girls—it is about time I found a few more possibilities.

Then lunch, just as I was beginning a letter to Sandy Schaedel [my cousin in Adelaide]—some time since I wrote a letter to her—and continued this after lunch, and before I had got too much further, Peggy came in with some grotty, pinholed, blotchy photos and relevant negatives, and then proceed to tell me some dirty German jokes at the slightest excuse—they were, admittedly, rather amusing, and I will obviously have to add them to my repertoire.

After that, carried on with my letter to Sandy for a while, and after that got fed up, lay down on my bed, and went off to sleep, which I probably needed.

After an hour and a half odd, woke up with Ann back, but not Jenni, who was playing tennis (as she had told me, but not Mrs. Hallett). Had tea (Paul was even there—told him Peggy's jokes, which he appreciated).

Jen back later, victorious, and quite happy until she turned on the tap for a drink of water and found none—oh, I am sick of her permanent irritability. I wonder how much there is in the astrological suggestion that we are incompatible.

Left her reading her prospectuses (which arrived at lunch time), and off into the caravan, started a letter to Otto and Else [Dietrichs, in Hamburg-Lohbrügge] after finishing off my letter to Sandy, and listened to Paul's observations on the end of the world.

Then developed the VP which Paul Ingram gave me last week, and got a rather fatuous comment from Jeni. She is obviously either hurt (as I think she is) or just plain angry. Went off to bed, and deliberately didn't even day good night. Also!


Wednesday, 19 July 1967 Greenwood → Ryde → Greenwood
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I do not know how I expect this affair with Jenni to end—if indeed it is going to end—but I did not really expect to carry on just not talking to each other from now until I go to Germany. In any case, we are again reconciled—after breakfast, she came into the lounge, where I was, and asked what was the matter with me. Pointed out that she had suggested I got myself another bird. She said nothing, went to the window to look at a rabbit. I joined her. That was how and where it all started, 15 months ago. She apologised. Now what? Jeni, if only you would love me, I am still quite capable of loving you—but I have exhausted my capacity for unilateral love.

Then she off to school, albeit only for the morning, and left me to my own devices. I really am stagnating here, especially in the last couple of weeks. Still, only 5 days now. What does the future hold for me?

Finished off my letter to Otto and Else, and then hung about doing nothing in the caravan, until I decided to take Prince for a walk, and then back again. At least Prince should have nothing to complain about from this stagnation of mine.

After that, reading Paul's motorbike magazines in his room. I suppose a bike is rather fun, but not nearly as versatile as a 2CV.

Jen back somewhat earlier than I had expected her, and came in, said hello, and would not kiss me. Maybe I should have let her stew a little longer before I had her back—or maybe I shouldn't have had her back. Still—what the hell? I wish I understood my mind.

Eventually came a cooked lunch—I much prefer that to salad, though it strikes me that nowhere in this part of the world is a heavy evening meal very popular. What about France? I seem to remember something about 2 heavy meals a day, which is better yet.

After lunch, intentions were to go to Ryde, to get our tickets mainly, and this took a long time—spent mainly lying on the floor playing with Jenni.

Eventually Jenni and I down town to pick up some traveller's cheques at the bank, and back again, and then off, after picking up Mrs. Hallett, to Ryde, where I posted a few letters to people in various corners of the earth, and shelled out £4··17··11 for my ticket to Paris, and spent the rest of the time following Jenni round as she bought some clothes, shoes, etc, though supposedly looking for presents for Christine and her mother. Oh well. Saw a Fed for sale in a shop at Ryde—Jen's is obviously a Fed, and not a Leica. Might also explain why the baseplate fits so badly—though everything else is interchangeable, it would seem.

Back again to the house, and had tea, which was just ea, as we had already had “dinner”—uncivilised habit.

After that, down with Jen to pick up Ann, but no go—couldn't find her. Back, Jen applied for yet more prospectuses, and off down again to post them. Got back, more or less put the enlarger back together, and made some prints. This paper of Paul's is surprisingly sensitive—about 10 times as fast as Kodak.


Thursday, 20 July 1967 Greenwood
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Woke up earlier than usual this morning, and in to find a letter from Dad, who is not at all pleased with me, and seemed at first not to allow me to go to Germany on the 24th, but such seemed not to be the case when I read it more closely. Still, he is by no means happy with me, and I am, amongst other things, going to have to write and explain my expenditure since I have been here—that should be easy enough, as long as I can remember what I spent it on. Jenni was still in bed when I got up, and so was nearly late for school—she was worried in case I couldn't come with her to France, but I will still be able to make it. May, however, thumb to Hamburg (or rather, Lüneburg) from Paris, which should save me quite a bit of money. Still, I will be steaming.

After that, Jeni off, doing her best to kiss me goodbye, and then I, rather depressed, took Prince off for a walk up onto the downs, where I had intended to sit with my thoughts and meditate—it was a beautiful day—the weather here has been pretty good most of the while—but Prince would not leave me alone, kept licking me, etc.

Down to the house again, and in and started reading the bike magazines—what the hell? 2CV or bike? Bike would be more fun, 2CV more practical.

After a while, started strolling down to the bus stop, and eventually arrived Jenni, having come 1st, 2nd and 3rd in her 3 events, and as a result, comparatively happy, though exhausted, having done 4 whole lengths of the pool.

Had lunch, which Jen ate mainly in an armchair, as she could not sit up properly, and then I in onto my bed, and soon joined by Jeni, who, however, only stayed for about half an hour before going off to sleep. I subsequently also to sleep, and woke up at regular intervals by dogs and cars etc, and more or less managed to sleep until Jenni woke me up at about 1745, having already been awake for about ¾ hour, and having washed her hair, which I had done already done [sic] this morning.

In for tea, which was on the table, and shortly later arrived Paul, not very talkative, back from the Island agricultural show, where he had been driving a tractor, and then Jeni and I in to watch TV, which was not too bad for a change—at any rate until Peggy and Helen came in, and I had an argument with Paul, Jeni, and any other comer, and hit Jeni, which she did not like, and then both out, Jen to do homework, I to take Prince for a walk, and then back to take some silhouettes of Jeni, and then out to the darkroom to tidy the place up. Back inside, and with Jen watching a programme on Nikita Khrushchev in exile, very interesting. Is she getting more affectionate lately? After that, and supper, back into the darkroom to do some printing, and develop my first successful HPS (only 1600 ASA).


Friday, 21 July 1967 Greenwood
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Up very late this morning, mainly because Paul did not go off to work until about 0825, and very nearly did not bother, except that Jeni wanted some photos, which she would never have been able to find herself, and so up and got them for her—not that I subsequently got much thanks for it.

After that, off went Jeni, Ann and father, and I had breakfast with Mrs. Hallett, who was not feeling very well, and as a result had only just got up. As a result of her unwell feeling, helped her with the washing up, and then out to take Prince for a walk, which I am doing often enough of late, and this time down onto the marsh, with my Edixa, to take some photos, as I am lending this camera to Jeni for a while. If only Jeni was [sic] a little more highly sexed... I suppose she will get that way sooner or later, and then I will be able to cash in on it. Oh, what the hell?

Back up to the house, and discovered that Mrs. Hallett was doing more washing, and so gave her just a couple of things to wash for me, and then into the caravan, and started writing a letter to Dad about all my omissions, etc, and ended up a little puzzled by the way I had arranged all the slides, which I eventually more or less sorted out. Also did something about sorting out the stuff that I am leaving here, and that that I am taking with me.

Then lunch, which was extremely late—Mrs. Hallett started off the day late, and remained late the whole day. Round about then the blokes from the Town Council arrived to clear the cesspit, and in the process snapped the washing line, and bent the diesel oil pipe round which they had wrapped it.

After lunch, out helping Mr. Hallett remove a stump when they came back, and manage to haul out the thing with their lorry. Finished off the Pan F in the Edixa in the process.

Then inside and more packing, and then fixed up the Edixa so that Jenni could use it, and did my best, despite the Water Board's attempts, to have a bath, after which down to the bus stop to meet Jenni. Thank God that will probably be the last time I ever have to do that. It really is a waste of time.

Back up with Jenni, and as soon as we got back she started reading her university prospectuses, and in to watch TV while I more or less showed her how to load a film into the Edixa, which she did not do too badly. Then watching TV again for a while, and after a while I out into the caravan, to be shortly joined by Jeni, and she is in an odd mood of late—I wish she enjoyed kissing more often. I fear this is the end of another beautiful friendship.

In the evening, watching TV mainly. If only I could find a bird to come outside more often—oh, what is wrong between me and Jen? Discussing cars with Paul.


Saturday, 22 July 1967 Greenwood
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So draws this, my longest yet, and probably longest ever, stay here to a close. Looking back on it, what have I gained from it? My relationship with Jeni is little more intimate (at least, on a sexual plane) than it was when I arrived, and it now looks pretty certain (to me, at any rate), that this affair is shortly to come to a close. Oh, what the hell? (which is hardly the first time I have asked this question of late. Maybe it has some bearing on the way I feel. I probably understand Jeni better than any other bird I know, and do not particularly like what I know. I have argued with her, etc—even struck her on occasion. I have, at any rate, found out to a greater or lesser extent what makes women tick—or at least, one woman.

Yes, there's a missing ) there.

Jen was still in bed when I came in, myself fairly late, and said something about getting up in due course. Still not very happy when I go up to her room when she is in bed. Eventually she came down, and started making us some breakfast, and had just about made it when arrived Paul, to throw a further spanner in the works.

Eventually breakfast was over, and Jennie came along and asked me to do the washing up, and so helped her. After that suggested that she finished off the film which I had given her yesterday to be finished off by today. Rather reluctantly, she set off with Paul, Prince and me to the barn, and we took a few interesting photos from there, and then back again, by why time Jeni had lost interest, and it was all I could do to persuade her to take a shot with a 400 mm lens.

After lunch, pointed out that she had undertaken to finish the film today, and had got very little through it, and ended up in another argument, and I saw red violently, as I have not done for a long time, and clobbered her—why did I have to do it to her, of all people?—which made her burst into tears and run for Mum, who threatened to kick me out. Oh, why did I have to do it to Jen?

Upstairs and apologised to her, which she said she accepted, but pretty obviously was still in a bad way, and so I down to shed my own tears, until Jen insisted that I accompany her down town—I seem to remember that last September I was not allowed to accompany Paul in a similar manner. Now I am expected to accompany Jen.

This must have been in the car. Jenny had a learner's license and needed somebody with a real driving license to accompany her. Strictly speaking, I didn't have one, only a Malaysian driving license

Around the library—they have“Beds in the East” by Burgess there, but Jen would not borrow it—and town, I feeling very dejected by the way Jen kept harping on the fact that I had hit her. That will be the end of us.

Home, and left Ann in the car down the lane, and up ourselves by foot, and had just made a couple of cups of tea when everybody arrived home, and Paul very angry with Jen for not waiting for him when we went down town—she ran to me for protection!—and, after he had calmed down, got talking with him and Mrs. Hallett about how old one should be before marriage.

The evening was, apart from doing an EMS, pretty well wasted. Spent most of it with Jenni sitting on my knee—oh, my aching prick!-and made a very late night of it.


Sunday, 23 July 1967 Greenwood
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Up a bit later than normal today, at about 0900 hrs, and in to find Jenni just about finishing her breakfast (though this did not occur to me at the time), and, after washing, upstairs, to where she had resettled herself in bed—if ever anything is frustrating, it is this girl. I wonder for the umpteenth time what the birds at University will be like. Possibly a little more broad-minded, if nothing else. And maybe I will find one whose interests more closely match my own—oh, to be with Sue Peters again. That was a romance that was nipped in the bud, unfortunately, and now we are miles apart.

Had my breakfast with Paul, and shortly after arrived Jeni downstairs, and I was just about heading out into the caravan to start packing when Jeni came down on me (“Greggie darling”) and asked me to help her with the wiping up, and so, of course, helped, and then out (finally) to start packing, and Paul there with me, and threw quite a few things at him. Bloke from Post office with telegram from Else—wants to know when I am coming.

Jen out a bit later, and we took Prince for a walk up to the barn and back, and then off back to the packing, and objections from Mrs. Hallett when I brought in the PCR, and this resulted in Paul and me smuggling the thing in, and eventually got them in. [sic]

Then lunched on duckling, which I found very nice, though unfortunately somewhat lacking in quantity, though the rest of the family did not like it.

After lunch, was just preparing to develop a Pan F, when somebody came out looking for “Greggie darling”, and I was landed with the wiping up for lunch as well. God, if this is how I get on just living with Jen for 6 weeks, what would it be like being married to a woman for all one's life?

What a horrible thought, drying up twice in a day. Thank God for dishwashers!

Eventually got that done, and then out to the darkroom and developed my Pan F, which I somehow got done 20 minutes sooner than Paul's Pan F, though we both started at the same time.

Then out with Jeni as she finished off her Pan F (and, to do her credit, she did finish it off), and then inside and did little for a while. Paul eventually came to a settlement with his mother about the radio equipment, and I out to, rather spasmodically, do a little more packing, and so on until teatime, which was remarkably unorganised by Mr. Hallett, as Mrs. was helping Jen with her packing, and could not come for a while. Jen has of late been teasing me for not being fashion conscious. What does she expect me to do—get about in all this Carnaby St getup. Or what? And who doe she expect to pay for all this? Certainly not Dad.

Eventually got tea over and done with. I am beginning to feel a bit hungry of late. Out to help Paul, who was having trouble with grotty developer, and blaming it on the paper, and he left me to it, and so I printed what was worthwhile out of this afternoon's Pan F, and then inside again, by which time everybody was watching TV, and ened up (after a bit of persuasion) with Jen on my knee again. Now what? Habis. [Malay: the end]


Monday, 24 July 1967 Greenwood → Southampton →
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And so on to my last day here—not that the fact really worries me: Jenni has proven to be too much of a disappointment for that. Paul came in at about 0830—late—to say goodbye in case he did not see me this evening. Assured him that he would, and so he went off, apparently quite happy, and I hear Jeni saying goodbye to him as he went off—apparently she did not expect to see him again—or perhaps even hoped to: she could be nicer to him.

Then she came in to see me, and after a vain attempt to drag her into bed with me, let her get out (lest I offend her abundant modesty) before getting up and staggering into the kitchen. There managed to get hold of some breakfast, rather against my expectations, and then in vain tried to secure Jenni for any period of time. Poor Jeni—I suppose that one's first trip abroad must be a wierd [sic] and wonderful experience, and come what may, one must be ready for it. I wonder how I would react under Jeni's circumstances: with my Wanderlust (which under Jeni's circumstances, I would not have, but let us ignore that) I would probably go nearly mad with excitement.

Carried on spasmodically packing myself through the morning, in between times taking Prince and Jeni for a walk and reading about psychology in an old Sunday Times magazine—I have now convinced myself that I am a psychopath—so let this remain in carbon and ink here until I become one!

Makan as usual—Jeni a little irritable because she wanted to go into town, and she had to wait for Daddy to load some potatoes into the car.

Eventually down town, with Ann as ballast, and Jeni decided that, as we had so little time, we should go separate ways, and so I to the bank, where I was informed that my balance was £2 less than expected—heaven help me when outstanding cheques come in—but the chief accountant let me go about 10/- [ten shillings, half a £] into the red when I told him that I would soon be getting a remittance from Dad. Then to the GPO, where I posted a letter to Dad, registered slides to Mum & Dad, and an ELT [letter telegram] to Otto & Else telling them of my plans.

Then back, 15 minutes late, where the car should have been, but instead found Jeni, and after a lot of discussion, bought a present for Christine. Then an argument over seasick pills—why should we always argue—and so separately home. When Jen got back, called me a pig—oh. Had a bath, another argument, and after tea off to Southampton. Jen not too sad at leaving family, as she had me, and then spent about an hour walking from dock to dock. More time wasted waiting at the dock, and on the boat at about 2230 hrs, and after looking round the boat, settled down together for the night, and so I off to sleep, to be


Tuesday, 25 July 1967 (France) → Le Havre → Paris → Idontcaretoremember
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woken by Jeni about an hour later, to be told that she couldn't get to sleep. Suggested she took one of her seasick tables, which eventually she did, though, to my astonishment, they did not put her completely out.

Eventually, both of us managed to get some kind of sleep—Jen less than I, I fear, for I got little enough, though much of this was Jen's fault rather than mine. Eventually, at about 0500 hrs, Jen sort of noticed that I was more or less awake, and so had me to get up and show her round the deck, which, with a lot of persuasion, I did, and then in to have a final cup of tea before Jen set foot for the first time on foreign soil, and this we did, catching an exorbitantly priced taxi to the station, where we hung around for a while, looking round at what was only too obviously France, and then to the station again, and got on the train, and promptly fell asleep—or at least I did. I woke up about an hour later to find Jen reading "The three hostages", and soon put an end to that. Is she still as worried about parting as she used to be? I wonder.

Eventually arrived at the Gare St. Lazare, and, with a bit of difficulty, found this Hervé whatshisname bloke, who directed us par métro as quickly as possible to the Gare d'Austerlitz, which was nonetheless too late, and the next train was at 1845, which was a long wait, and Hervé had to go back to his work, not that I minded: he was a bit too nice for my liking, and I was (and still am—he is going down to Ribérac net week) about Jen falling for him.

Yes, there's a verb missing in the last sentence.

Off then with Jen, and not far away found a restaurant where we had some typically Parisien dish like an omelette and bread, and then out off walking in what I imagined to be the Île de la Cité, and then after Jeni had tried in vain to get off to sleep, and then went and bought some chalk and a map, and then back to the Gare d'Austerlitz, where we waited around until Jeni's train came in, and I went on with her, and she did her best not to cry, but tears came nonetheless. Voilà! She still feels the same way about me!

Off, via 5 changes, to the Métro station at Carrefour Pleyel, and got a lift with an ancient Peugeot 203 which (as I subsequently discovered) put me on the wrong route. Then a Renault Gordini, which took me up to about 40 km out of Paris to a place called Creil, and a Peugeot 404 Safari a bit further on—water is NF 2.00 per litre, and wine only NF 1.10. Je ne le comprends pas. Slept on the roadside. Lifts are lousy.


Wednesday, 26 July 1967 (Belgium) → St Quentin → Bruxelles →
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Woke up several times in the night when a particularly noisy 2CV or something woke me up, and each time was agony as I looked round to see what had become of Jeni, and each time it occurred to me that by this time shoe would be in Angoulème or Ribérac. Eventually, round about 0400 hrs, it began to dawn, and before too long managed to stop a Citroën Light 15, who was only going as far as Clermont, but when I explained that I was trying to get to the North, took me on further to the main road [the N17], and dropped me there, 67 kms from Paris—what a hell of a belt I am moving at!

That was 0500 hrs when I got there. Stayed there thumbing until 0700 hrs, when I gave up in disgust, and decided to walk the 3 km to the nearest town and see if I could get a train from there to Brussels, and then to see the British Consulate there about more money. Got about 1 km, and then a bloke in a Simca gave me a lift to a place, 2.5 km from Misery, which seemed an appropriate name for a place, and so thumbed on to Péronne, a big town, and to the station, where eventually I got a ticket to St. Quentin, which cost me NF 9.70, and was just about to get on the train when I discovered that St. Quentin was only 28 km away, and so decided to thumb there. That was really abominable. 3 hours later, I was about 4 km from Péronne, [a significant portion of this had been on a tractor] and little chance of getting much further, so lay down in the middle of the road and pretended to have collapsed, and before I knew it, 3 cars had materialised out of nowhere, stopped, and were doing their best to help me, [interestingly, the first person to stop was an Englishman on his way back home, with a ferry to catch. I was left with the feeling that the French, at least in these parts, are not very compassionate people] and eventually they flagged won a Peugeot 404, told him the story as they knew it, and got him to take me to the St. Quentin railway station. Once there, cleaned up a bit, and then bought a ticket to Brussels. Unfortunately, the next train was due to leave at 1617, and so I would not have arrived in Brussels until after the High Commissions, [This is the incorrect term. High Commissions exist only in the British Commonwealth. In Bruxelles I would have been looking for the Australian and British consulates] etc, had closed.

Out of the station, and looked round for a place to buy some food, and ended up buying some of the usual french fare—bread, butter, cheese, and wine. Back, had my meal of the day, and then started on a letter to Jeni, telling her what had happened to me, and what I intended to do, and then, after writing 5½/6 pages, off to post the thing, putting on only a 30c stamp instead of a 70c (as it weighed over 20 gms—which surprised me). Then off on a very crowded train to Brussels,

On this train, I had an interesting experience. I'm surprised I didn't write it down here: I was standing in the aisle (as I said, the train was very crowded), speaking in my limited French to a girl I had met there. She had trouble with French, too, which wasn't her native language. She said, in Flemish, "why don't we speak Flemish—it's easier for both of us". She was wrong: I don't speak Flemish, but I find two things about the incident to be particularly interesting:
  • I understood her anyway. It's close enough to German.
  • It's surprising how many people think I'm Dutch (which, at the risk of offending my Dutch friends, is really just a dialect of Flemish).

and there out and into a park, where I caught up on my diary and sleep, and then wandered round, feeling very lonely and unlike spending another night under the stars, and so off to a pub, and was having a drink and talking to a bloke when the police came in, searched him, and carried him off. Got a free drink from one of his friends, and then bought (with what funds I had remaining) a ticket to Köln, hoping that I would oversleep at Köln and go on to Hamburg.

In fact, I think that when I bought the ticket I didn't know where the train terminated. It could just as easily have been München.

On the train OK, with a


Thursday, 27 July 1967 (Deutschland)
→ Köln → Hamburg →
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couple of girls from Bremen and a bloke from Poland (where, I do not know), and after a brief conversation trying to persuade the Pole what an Enkel [grandchild] was (I think we eventually decided it was a Katchka), off to sleep, and then was woken somewhere near Aachen to be asked for passport control and had a bit of fun there because in my passport I had no beard, and the fellow threatened all sorts of things because it was ungültig [invalid]. Eventually let me through, and a little later, after we had finally got out of Aachen, came the customs looking for tobacco and coffee—why coffee, I do not know.

At the time, there were heavy taxes on coffee and tea in Germany.

Then off to sleep, and as luck would have it, when next I woke we were pulling out of Düsseldorf, and a few minutes later came a ticket inspector, and so made quite a show of searching everywhere for my ticket, having decided by this time that I had bought a ticket from Bruxelles to Hamburg, and found it of course not. [Fortunately, the German railway tickets at the time looked almost identical to London Underground tickets, of which I had a large number in my jacket pocket] The fellow said something about coming back, but time went by, and nothing happened, and so off to sleep again. When I finally woke up, we were past Bremen, and in the carriage was the most potbellied bloke I have ever seen, who I think got on at Münster. In came the ticket inspector again, and suggested I searched my cases for it.

In fact, he had told me that I would have to buy a new ticket. I really didn't mind doing so: after all, I hadn't paid the first one, and the only reason I did that was because I didn't have the money. I asked him if he would take a cheque, and he said yes. But then he discovered that it was an English cheque, and that was too complicated for him.

Had another look, for the sake of the pot-bellied bloke, and got into a conversation with him, and then we were in Hamburg and out. Fortunately, no ticket collector was at the Ausgang [exit], so found my bearings and over to the ZOB.

The Zentraler Omnibusbahnhof, or Central Bus Station.

and tried to get a bus to Lohbrügge, which was not very easy, though eventually I managed, and then found, despite the driver of the bus, the right bus stop, and got off, and finally to the Dietrichs. Else and Otto were both delighted to see me, and welcomed me literally with open arms, and insisted on feeding me until it came out of my ears ("Ach, es ist herrlich, wenn man Hunger hat'"), and then had a bath, and feeling a little more human, got round to setting all my stuff in Ordnung, and then, almost before I knew it, came lunch time. I had just been showing Else my photos, and subsequently was trying to explain why Spiegelreflexkameras [(single lens) reflex cameras] were better than Entfernungsmesserkameras [rangefinder cameras], and was demonstrating the Edixa to her, when in came Otto and we all had a "light" lunch of bread (including the stuff I had both in St. Quentin yesterday) and Käse [cheese] and Wurst [sausage] usw.

Else surprised me by using the remains of my bread. In France, bread is almost invariably eaten the same day; in Germany the bread keeps for up to a week.

After that, it was suggested that I might like to have a rest, as I must be tired after all that travelling, and I agreed that a short rest might do me good, and so pumped up my Li-lo, and before 1500, was fast asleep.

At 2000 hrs, woke up and into the Küche [kitchen], where Else was boiling some extraordinary looking fish, which she said were 9-Augen [9 eyes] on account of the orange marks in the skin. Quite nice. After that, off down to a callbox to ring up a bloke called Groß*, student at Hamburg University, and with Otto, and then off with this bloke on a pub crawl—he is doing chemistry, and has only been there one semester. Quite a nice bloke, and doubtless he will be very helpful to me. Invited me to a free-for-all party tomorrow night. Sounds good.

* Gerd-Ulricht Groß

In fact, of course, his name was Gerd-Ulrich


Friday, 28 July 1967 Lohbrügge
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Up this morning at about 0900 and outside to find Else doing something about breakfast, and discovered that Otto had already gone to work—I did not realise that he still worked, though I suppose somebody has to earn the money, especially in a country with even fewer welfare services than in England.

In fact, the social welfare system in Germany was probably better than in the UK, but that's not the propaganda we heard in the UK.

Said something about the both of them getting up at 0600 hrs—being doing it for years, and now find it quite normal.

I can't remember how old Otto was, but it must have been round 70. He was some years older than Else, who must have been 64 at the time, and in not very good health. And Germans, particularly those of that generations, did get up extremely early.

Had breakfast, while Else said something about going into town with her to do the shopping, and asked me if I would like to come with her. Agreed readily—in fact, a little too readily for her liking, as I think she thought I said it just to please her. Persuaded her, however, that I genuinely did want to come with her, and so put on some fairly respectable clothing and down to wait for the bus, while I was told, for what is probably the umpteenth time (ever since Otto came out with his famous "You will become three tickets"), [in August 1963] how the buses run. Off eventually into Bergedorf, and had my work cut out just keeping up with Else. Wide as she is, she somehow has a knack of getting through crowds which I find difficult to imitate. The fact was not helped by the fact that today is the market day, and so the place was swarming with people. Bought a few postcards, and then off back home, and started writing a couple, and then had a comparatively heavy lunch (though Else said something about waiting till the evening. What factors do govern the custom of when one eats one's main meal of the day?

Another missing ).

Then started a comparatively long letter to Jenni, picking up the story as from St. Quentin, and spent quite a while on that. Then had a look at the old Lexikon (which apparently means encyclopaedia as well as dictionary—or did in 1898, at any rate), which is in the room where I am sleeping—that was very interesting, and extremely comprehensive (18 volumes), if a bit out of date. I find the Frakturschift [old German script, resembling Old English script, which was used in Germany until about the mid-20th century] much more beautiful than the Antikenscrift [sic; should be Antiqua, which nonetheless is modern], as well—pity it is now more or less dead, except in a few things, such as Bibles and German readers in England.

Then finished my letter to Jenni, and off, after changing to the Bergedorfer Bahnhof [railway station], arriving a little later than arranged, but still a couple of minutes before Gerd, and then off to do some shopping, and met his mother on the way, and she is quite nice. Did some shopping, but got caught in the rain before I had a chance to go to the Post office, and so back to Gerd's home, and had a look at his chemistry books, which seem quite interesting, and not all that hard—except for the physical chemistry, that is, which is almost all calculus. Then sat and talked—had a look at some magazines, etc. —interesting satirical job, "Pardon", rather like “Private Eye”. Then off to this party out in the country somewhere, but somehow it never got moving owing to a very poor balance of males/females—too many of the former. Gerd bought 2 1 litre Löwenbräu glasses for us for the beer—that was good planning, and for my 3 DM I got 4 litres of Bier. Met a bird


Saturday, 29 July 1967 Lohbrügge
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called Selke, who Gerd had said was rather keen to meet me, but that was about all she wanted to do, or soon she lost interest or something. Gerd was meanwhile in bed with his bird, so I decided to do what I could to even the ratio, and left for home by foot—only about 7 or 8 km, and arrived home at about 0200 hrs.

Not surprisingly after all that, woke up quite late, and out to where Else was doing something in the kitchen, which she promptly dropped and asked me how I had liked the party, and was overjoyed when I said I had enjoyed it. Particularly amused when I told her about the beer glasses, and so on.

After breakfast, Otto said something about going into town, and again, wanted to know whether I would like to come, and so, of course, I agreed. This travelling to and fro into town should work out quite expensive, except that Otto usually manages to appear with a couple of 50 Pf coins, and tell me for the umpteenth +1 time that it costs 50 Pf to get into Bergedorf, and that I was to catch the bus on the south side of the road...

In Bergedorf, went shopping, and I bought a copy of “Hobby”, which seems to be the only generally available magazine in this country—or at any rate, in the smaller newsagents in Bergedorf, though the place at the Bahnhof is quite good.

Then had a look at the Bergedorfer Schloß, with a good running commentary from Otto, and took a couple of photos, and then into a coffee shop for some coffee, with a Bols to give the appetite, and cake—but DM 6,40 for the lot seems a hell of a lot for Otto to have to cough up.

Back home, and lunch was intended to be a light meal, and indeed it almost looked as if they were going to dispense with it, but fortunately not so. Eventually into the kitchen, and all made our own Butterbröte [sic] with whatever we wanted on top, and then into the lounge, and ate them there. If there is one thing I really like about this country, it is the bread.

After that, thoughts were about having a bit of a rest in the afternoon (shades of last Thursday), and spent a bit of time reading, after which I went down and rang up Gert, and he had apparently been worried about what had happened to me last night, though I told him that he had nothing to worry about, and that I did it regularly. Suggested something about going into Hamburg tomorrow night, but that he was not yet sure, and that I had better ring him back tomorrow night and find out.

Back home, and another long rest until about 1915, when I got up pretty quickly, as Else had said something about eating at 1900, but it was another hour before much came of it.

After that—that was pancakes and mushrooms, not fantastically wonderful, but not at all bad—into the Wohnzimmer, and did a bit of reading—in fact, quite a bit of reading, what with all the magazines I have—and eventually at about 2330 to bed.


Sunday, 30 July 1967 Lohbrügge → Hamburg → Lohbrügge
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Woke up late yet again—I don't know what sort of impression this is making on Else and Otto, though I don't suppose I have much to worry about there—they are unlikely to worry about all that. Still, by the time I had got up, Otto was gone somewhere, and both he and Else had already had breakfast, so yet again I had to have it by myself. Nothing really much to do in the morning—had just about the whole day (or at any rate, what was left of it) to myself, and so, after a bit of consideration, wrote a letter to Paul telling him of all the things, both pleasant and nasty, that had happened to me since last I saw him, only a week ago (Nay, 6 days), and in particular, the not-so-nice-as-could-be-expected prices of Praktica, with the exception (notable) of the Nova with Oreston. After a while it was suggested to me that my Marienkäfer (ladybird) which I had put in the fridge last night to keep quiet, might be restless, and so plenty of fun proving that the thing was anything but quiet, especially since Otto had warmed him up “no that he would not be too sluggish”. Eventually got him waking round the rim of a plastic container, and every time he came to a particular point, I fired.

After that, had lunch, which was a welcome change from the ladybirds and things (a thought. I wonder how much the term “bird” as in modern English usage [i.e. “girl”] can be traced to the word “ladybird”), after which Else found that the strain of both cooking and eating her wonderful lunch had proved too much, and so she, and, not much later, Otto, went off to sleep, and I decided to hang around and real all the “Jllustrierte”, a type of magazine just not found in England. Interesting scandal there, and eventually, after I had read all that I felt like, off to ring up Gerd, and found that neither Belgian 1-Franc or Turkish 10 Kurus pieces will fit in the things instead of 10 Dpf pieces, so back, got some money from Else, and eventually rang Gerd up, and he said something about going into Hamburg, and that he had a bird for me, so quickly back (especially when I found I would need an earlier bus, and washed as best I could, and then down to Bergedorf, and met Gerd, and subsequently his girlfriend and another on the S-Bahn platform, and was introduced pretty well without hearing her name. In Hamburg, headed towards the Reeperbahn (that is famous enough), and on the way got talking with her, and it seems that she goes to an English language school in Hamburg. To a place called the top 10 club,

It wasn't until many years later that I discovered that the Top Ten Club was famous in its own right.

and there got off to a rather slow start, not helped by the fact that the noise was as in Jackies. Had a bit of fun at 2200 hrs, as she is only 17, and pretended that we were both English tourists. Things moved a bit better after that, though not at the breakneck pace I usually start my affairs off at—I prefer it this way. She, at any rate, seems to like me (though I must surely have become more sceptical about this since I last said it—of Lesley Cannings. Seemed genuinely unhappy to see me go—or do I misunderstand her. Got her address, though, and while I was at it, her name—Corinna von Fisenne. Noble blood!—and her father was a senator.


Monday, 31 July 1967 Lohbrügge → Hamburg → Lohbrügge
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Up yet again quite late—would doubtless have been much later, had Else not taken the initiative and come along and asked me whether I eigentlich in Hamburg wollte oder not. Said I would, and so quickly up, and in the same clothes as last night, and had some breakfast. I find it odd, but nice as Corinna is, I do not experience much desire for her—I wonder if this is something to do with, or any rate in accordance with, my rectangular hyperbola theory. Quite likely. Eventually had breakfast, and off down to the bus stop, and found it quicker (and just as cheap) to go to Bergedorf, and then with the S-Bahn into town, I to the Hauptbahnhof and Else further. Once out of the Hbf decided that, as I had arranged to meet Else by the Alsterpavillon, I would not go far wrong if I went round the Außenalster and took a few photos—I did not particularly feel like going round town. The Alster is quite a big lake, and I got (I hope) quite a few interesting photos there.

Round quite slowly, though I suppose it must be at least 5 km round the place [in fact, it's more like 7]—and found, by the time I was ⅓ round the thing, that I only had ½ hour, and so stepped on the gas, and eventually found the Alsterpavillon, about 1159, at the other end of the Binnenalster, and after looking for Else, sat down and discovered what an expensive place this was—they must make a living off tourists—there are certainly enough of them in Hamburg, and I am reminded of the girl Jenni spoke to in Paris last Tuesday. Eventually came Else along, and had an ice cream, and then through the shopping centre (saw an Exakta Real—much cheaper than they had ever dreamed it would be: f/2.8 Trav [?] for only 860 DM!). Off after that to the Rathaus, where, after a bit of discussion, we decided that we would pay the 1 DM for a guided tour, which I found very interesting, but Else (strange for a woman of 60) found it decidedly boring and terribly old (only 100 years!) and was only to glad to get out and into the Ratskeller for lunch—Forellen, which I expect means trout. Quite nice, though I think I would have preferred a nice fillet steak nonetheless. Then out and had a look at a few cameras—no really cheap Prakticas or Edixas, though an Exa IIb with Domiplan for only DM 118.

After that, to the ZOB, and bought some magazines, and then in the bus to Lohbrügge, and arrived there about 1630, and spent the next hour recovering/relaxing, which in fact meant reading the magazines I had bought—they like the Citroën Ami 6 break. Then rang up Gerd, but he had gone somewhere with his girlfriend, and reckoned [?] to be pleased to see me when I came back from Lüneburg.

Spent the evening at home with Otto and Else, who went very early to bed, and so I stayed up reading magazines—I can certainly understand them better of late.


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